EvilTeddy369

v171:

Remember that time when Mississippi State took a photograph of me and put it on their brochure and shipped it out to the entire country and didn’t realize I had a massive hickey on my neck?

(via onesexybuffalo)

travisconleycaughron:

How can you hate Deadpool I mean really

travisconleycaughron:

How can you hate Deadpool I mean really

(via space-cichlid)

hallowedhorrors:

I feel such pity for the homestucks who didn’t know faygo was an actual thing, or who live in places where you can’t find it, when I’m over here in Michigan like
imageimageimageimageimageimageimageShit’s a dietary staple here.

(via onesexybuffalo)

thorkizilla:

This is it.  This is the pinnacle of nerdom.  This is the greatest height of nerdery that has ever been reached before.

Peter in Loki’s body on a bus downtown to the real Loki and making an excuse that he’s going to a comic convention.

Never will such levels of pure fucking nerd ever be seen again, it’s just not possible.  This is a beautiful day, I am glad I am alive to experience this, god bless.

(via thedarklordkeisha)

spacewaluigi:

July 21st is the day that Mario Tennis for the N64 was released in japan, and it also marks the first appearance of Waluigi!

Happy birthday Waluigi!

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(via thedarklordkeisha)

shubbabang:

funny story my 5th grade elementary school teacher was the one who figured out i had crazy bad adhd

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i hope she’s doing well

(via eseneziri-tishinka)

“The truth is, everyone likes to look down on someone. If your favorites are all avant-garde writers who throw in Sanskrit and German, you can look down on everyone. If your favorites are all Oprah Book Club books, you can at least look down on mystery readers. Mystery readers have sci-fi readers. Sci-fi can look down on fantasy. And yes, fantasy readers have their own snobbishness. I’ll bet this, though: in a hundred years, people will be writing a lot more dissertations on Harry Potter than on John Updike. Look, Charles Dickens wrote popular fiction. Shakespeare wrote popular fiction - until he wrote his sonnets, desperate to show the literati of his day that he was real artist. Edgar Allan Poe tied himself in knots because no one realized he was a genius. The core of the problem is how we want to define “literature”. The Latin root simply means “letters”. Those letters are either delivered - they connect with an audience - or they don’t. For some, that audience is a few thousand college professors and some critics. For others, its twenty million women desperate for romance in their lives. Those connections happen because the books successfully communicate something real about the human experience. Sure, there are trashy books that do really well, but that’s because there are trashy facets of humanity. What people value in their books - and thus what they count as literature - really tells you more about them than it does about the book.”
— Brent Weeks (via victoriousvocabulary)

(via thedarklordkeisha)